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Welcome to
Troutdale Historical Society

Preserving Yesterday,
Enlightening Today,
Inspiring Tomorrow....

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Barn Hall

Thursday - Sunday
Noon - 3:00 p.m.

The Barn Exhibit Hall, conceived by John Nasmyth of the Troutdale Historical Society, stands as a testament to community passion. Nasmyth's innovative funding approach involved bringing a check whenever inspired. Spearheading construction was Dick Jones, a society find through historic home tours, earning him the title of the main builder despite his untimely passing. Opening a decade later, the hall showcased its first exhibit in 1998, "Smelt Run! A Fish Story," commemorating Troutdale's vibrant past. Subsequent exhibits delved into Lewis and Clark's exploration and Troutdale's centennial. Today, the hall captivates visitors with "King of Roads - Byway of the People," honoring the Historic Columbia River Highway's centennial, narrating its construction, decline, and preservation.​

Museums

Harlow House

Thursday - Sunday
Noon - 3:00 p.m.

Built in 1900 on the "Harlow Farm," the Harlow House in Troutdale has a rich history. Constructed by Fred E. Harlow, son of the town's founder, Captain John Harlow, originally a sea captain from Maine turned Portland businessman. Captain Harlow named the area Troutdale for its fish ponds. Fred E. Harlow and his family resided in the house until 1915. Lou Harlow, another son, and his wife Laura Bullock Harlow, both mayors of Troutdale, were the next occupants. Lee and Mabel Evans, the final residents, lived there in the 1940s. Purchased by the Troutdale Historical Society in 1979, the Harlow House, situated on high ground, survived the 1948 flood. Now a museum, it's listed on the National Register of Historical Places, with its grounds part of the city park system.

Rail Depot & Caboose

Thursday - Monday
9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

Tuesday - Wednesday

9:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Established in 1882, Troutdale's history revolves around a pivotal moment when founder Captain John Harlow persuaded railroad builders to establish a depot by leveraging the navigability of the Sandy River. The town thrived along the Union Pacific line, hosting diverse enterprises like a meat packing plant, distillery, lumber mill, opera house, and newspaper. The original 1882 depot, integral to shipping fresh vegetables, burned in 1907, replaced promptly. Now owned by Troutdale since 1976, the depot, moved to its current location, remains a historic treasure. The station agent's office preserves railroad artifacts, and a donated

caboose enhances the site since 1987,

     showcasing Troutdale's railroad legacy.                     

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UPCOMING

EVENTS

Click an image to open a full screen view and description of the event.

Clients

OUR SPONSORS

Fujii Farms
Historic Troutdale Barbershop
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VISITOR REVIEWS

"What a hidden gem! A must for anyone visiting or living here and wanting to find out more about the history of the gorge and the surrounding areas. The staff and volunteers are amazing."
Contact
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